The Question Of Innocence: “Why Does God Kill The Innocent?”

Why does God take the innocent?

It’s a question that hits you like a ton of bricks, right?

Picture this: you’re reading the Bible, and you come across stories like Sodom and Gomorrah, where God’s judgment seems to spare no one, not even the innocent.

I get it; it’s a head-scratcher.

Now, some folks, especially the skeptics, they call God a “moral monster.”

But hold on a minute.

We’ve got to unpack this.

We’re talking about the big stuff here: innocence, sin, repentance, and God’s sovereignty.

It’s like trying to solve a jigsaw puzzle without all the pieces.

But let me tell you, it’s all about finding that balance between judgment and redemption, understanding God’s ways, and recognizing the grace He offers us.

In this journey, we’re shining a light on the very heart of the Christian faith, where Jesus Christ is our guiding star.

So, buckle up, my friend, as we explore the mysteries of life, death, and the profound nature of God’s love.

Key Takeaways

  • Why does God kill the innocent? This profound question delves into God’s sense of justice and His supreme sovereignty. Understanding His divine plan is key.
  • The notion of innocence in the Bible is intricate, going beyond mere moral purity. It involves a multifaceted understanding that encompasses faith and trust in God.
  • Crucially, connecting with God through Jesus Christ is paramount. It’s through this relationship that we navigate these tough questions and find solace in our faith.
  • Exploring this question is an invitation to dive deeper into understanding God’s mysterious ways, leading to profound theological pondering.

Let’s Dive In: Understanding God’s Actions

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Hey there!

It’s PASTOR MICHAEL TODD, and we’re about to tackle a question that’s been on many hearts and minds: why does God allow what seems like harm to the innocent?

This is a real head-scratcher, and Richard Dawkins, in his book The God Delusion, throws in his two cents.

But we’re gonna break it down and talk about how we perceive God and the moral questions that arise.

Richard Dawkins’ Take

So, Mr.

Dawkins, a big believer in evolution and atheism, questions the stories we find in the Bible, especially the Old Testament.

He’s pointing fingers at incidents like Sodom and Gomorrah, wondering if God’s actions back then align with what we consider moral today.

Is God a Bad Guy?

This brings us to the big question: Is God truly a bad guy, like some folks say?

To dig deep, we’ve got to unravel concepts like innocence, sin, repentance, and God’s justice.

In the Old Testament, yeah, sometimes God’s actions seem heavy-handed—like wiping out cities.

But within the belief system, these actions are seen as the result of collective choices, not a mean streak from God.

The stories in the Bible often serve as a wakeup call to live right, turn away from wrongdoing, and follow the path of righteousness.

It’s vital to understand these stories in the context of their time, appreciating the messages they convey.

“Shall not the Judge of all the earth do right?”Genesis 18:25 (KJV)

In a nutshell, grappling with the idea of God as seemingly harsh involves diving into scripture, considering the time and place, and digging into the heart of divine justice.

It’s a journey that nudges us to ask fundamental questions about what’s fair, God’s sovereignty, and what it means to be human.

We’re in this together!

Why Does God Allow the Innocent to Suffer and Die?

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Life can be a real head-scratcher sometimes, can’t it?

We’ve all been there, questioning why God lets the innocent go through pain and hardship.

But you know what?

It’s a question that’s been asked for ages.

Let’s dig into this mystery together.

The Illusion of Innocence

We often look at children, for instance, and say they’re “innocent.”

But here’s the kicker – in God’s eyes, innocence isn’t as clear-cut as we think.

You see, we’re all born into a world tainted by sin.

This “fallen nature” thing affects every single one of us.

It’s like saying we’re all apples from the same tree, and that tree, my friends, is the tree of human nature.

So when you think about it, none of us are completely innocent.

Think about it this way: you can’t call one apple “good” and another “bad” just by looking at them.

They’re all apples, right?

Similarly, we all carry that sinful nature, and that’s why no one is truly innocent.

The Biblical Scoop

Now, let’s crack open our Bibles.

In Romans 3:23, it lays it out straight: “For all have sinned and come short of the glory of God.

We’re all in the same boat, friends – we’ve missed the mark.

Picture this: you’re trying to hit a bullseye on a target, but no matter how hard you try, you always fall short.

That’s what it’s like when we’re measured against God’s perfection.

His standard isn’t a scale of one to ten; it’s absolute perfection.

And when we step up to that plate, none of us even come close.

God’s Game Plan: Sovereignty and Justice

So, why does God let suffering happen, even to those we think of as innocent?

Here’s the deal: God is in control, and He’s always right.

His ways are higher than ours, and He sees the big picture.

When He allows challenges and difficulties, it’s not because He’s playing games, but because He knows something we don’t.

Think of it like this: Imagine you’re trying to teach your kid a valuable lesson.

Sometimes, you let them face a little hardship because you know it will make them stronger and wiser in the long run.

That’s kind of how God works.

He may allow trials and tribulations to draw us closer to Him or to bring about a greater purpose that’s beyond our understanding.

Now, remember, in God’s grand story, He’s not just thinking about the here and now; He’s got eternity in mind.

Those innocent lives we grieve for in this world may find their ultimate redemption and reward in the next.

“The Lord is righteous in all his ways, and holy in all his works.” – Psalm 145:17 (KJV)

In this wild rollercoaster called life, hold tight to your faith in God’s perfect justice, even when you can’t quite wrap your head around His ways.

Our understanding might be a bit limited, but His wisdom?

It’s off the charts.

Why God’s Ways Baffle Us: The Inevitable Encounter with Death

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Life is a perplexing journey, and one question that often perplexes both the young and the old is why God permits the innocent to face death.

It’s a deep well of inquiry, and we’re going to dip our toes into it to unravel the mystery.

See also  Faith And Revelation: Why Does God Blind The Eyes Of Unbelievers?

The Genesis of Death: The Ripple Effect of Adam and Eve’s Choice

To grasp why the innocent meet death, let’s rewind the tape to the very beginning.

In the garden of Eden, Adam and Eve were handed the gift of free will.

They had the choice to obey God or take a different path.

Sadly, they chose the latter, and in that choice, they unleashed sin into the world.

Sin, my friends, is like a contagious disease that has spread through the generations, tainting the entire human race.

It’s like a domino effect of disobedience, bringing not just physical death but also a spiritual chasm between us and the Divine.

In this sense, death is woven into the fabric of our existence because of our shared history of sin.

God’s Supreme Authority in Matters of Life and Death

Now, you might be wondering, “Why doesn’t God intervene to save the innocent from the clutches of death?”

Well, the thing is, God’s ways are way beyond our mental grasp.

He’s the Creator of the cosmos, and His wisdom goes way beyond our human comprehension.

He knows the intricate details of every life and has a plan that’s lightyears beyond our understanding.

God’s sovereignty extends to the realm of life and death.

Even though it might seem unfair from our perspective, He is the one holding the strings, deciding when and how someone’s earthly journey comes to a close.

His ways are righteous, even when they appear inscrutable to us.

“For as the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways, and my thoughts than your thoughts.”Isaiah 55:9 (KJV)

As we ponder this conundrum of why God permits the innocent to face death, we must keep in mind that He is a God of love and mercy.

His ultimate plan is for our eternal well-being, and in the grand puzzle of life, we might not always see the reasons behind His choices.

But we can have faith in His perfection, even when His ways seem like a mystery wrapped in an enigma.

So, as we grapple with the inevitability of death, let’s turn our eyes to the Almighty in faith, seeking His grace and understanding.

In Him, even in the face of life’s greatest mysteries, we find hope and solace.

Why Does God Act That Way in the Old Testament: Understanding the Bigger Picture

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Hey there, fam!

Ever cracked open your Bible and wondered, “Why does God allow bad stuff to happen, especially to the innocent?”

Trust me, you’re not alone.

We’re diving deep into the Old Testament today to unpack those moments when it feels like God’s got a thunderbolt in one hand and a magnifying glass in the other.

But, here’s the thing, there’s a method to the divine madness.

The Flood: Cleaning Up a Mess

Okay, picture this: The world had gone wild, like no rules, no justice, just pure chaos.

It’s like when you’re trying to cook but you’ve got no recipe, and you’re throwing in everything, including the kitchen sink.

That’s how humanity was rolling – every thought and action was messed up.

God wasn’t out to get the innocent; He wanted a fresh start, a do-over.

So, He hit the reset button with the flood, preserving the innocent represented by Noah and his crew.

It wasn’t about killing the good guys, but about giving humanity a second chance.

“And God saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually.”Genesis 6:5 (KJV)

Sodom & Gomorrah: The Sin City

Now, let’s talk about Sodom & Gomorrah – the ultimate party cities, but not in a good way.

These places were lost in sin, like a non-stop party where everything’s messed up.

God didn’t just snap His fingers and wipe them out; He actually had a conversation with Abraham.

Abraham asked God to spare the cities if there were even a handful of righteous folks.

Sadly, these cities were so deep in sin that they couldn’t be saved.

The innocent folks there got caught in the crossfire.

“And the Lord said, Because the cry of Sodom and Gomorrah is great, and because their sin is very grievous; I will go down now, and see whether they have done altogether according to the cry of it, which is come unto me; and if not, I will know.”Genesis 18:20-21 (KJV)

The Canaanite Nations: Deep in the Dark

Now, let’s shift gears to the Canaanite nations – the Hittites, Amorites, Canaanites, Perizzites, Hivites, and Jebusites.

These folks were into some pretty bad stuff, like sacrificing kids and bowing down to idols.

God’s decision to bring the hammer wasn’t about taking out the innocent but was a response to their long-term bad behavior.

God’s got all the patience in the world, but when people stick to their wrong ways, He steps in to set things straight.

God’s actions in the Old Testament are not about Him being a cosmic bully; it’s about His authority, justice, and His grand plan.

He gives folks chances to turn things around, and ultimately, His story unfolds through the ages, leading to Jesus Christ, our ultimate redemption.

So, in the face of all the drama, there’s also the promise of new life.

The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men count slackness; but is longsuffering to us-ward, not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance.”2 Peter 3:9 (KJV)

As we unpack these moments from the Old Testament, remember it’s not about God playing favorites or targeting the good guys; it’s about His commitment to justice, righteousness, and that grand plan of salvation.

God’s got your back, fam!

God’s Ways: Sovereignty and Justice Unveiled

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Hey there, fam!

Let’s dig deep into a question that often stirs hearts and minds: why does God allow the innocent to face trials?

It’s like trying to understand a complex puzzle, but let’s break it down and see what God’s Word tells us.

The Big Boss: God’s Unshakable Sovereignty

You see, God is the ultimate Boss, the CEO of the cosmos!

Imagine He’s the master chef in a cosmic kitchen, and He’s got all the ingredients and the recipe for life.

Every spice, every stir of the pot, every sizzle on the stove, He’s got it all planned out.

He’s the Grand Designer of our lives, and He’s got a blueprint that’s mind-blowingly intricate.

We might be puzzled, asking why He allows certain things, especially when it seems unfair.

But hold up!

He’s got a 4D view of this movie while we’re watching it in 2D.

He knows the plot twists, the character arcs, and how it all fits into His bigger plan, a plan for our good and a bright future.

For I know the plans I have for you, declares the LORD, plans for welfare and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope.”Jeremiah 29:11 (KJV)

The Divine Judge: God’s Unique Justice System

God’s justice?

It’s a bit like trying to explain calculus to a toddler.

We might not get every detail, but we can trust the math genius!

His justice is a blend of fairness, righteousness, and wisdom that surpasses anything we can fathom.

He’s not just making rulings; He’s making a masterpiece out of our lives.

Think of it like a coach making tough calls during a game.

Sometimes the calls might seem questionable, but the coach knows the game plan, the plays, and how it all adds up to a victory.

The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men count slackness; but is longsuffering to us-ward, not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance.”2 Peter 3:9 (KJV)

So, when we face those tough moments, when we don’t get why things are happening, remember, God’s got this.

He’s not a monster; He’s a loving Father with a plan for each one of us.

Trusting His sovereignty and believing in His justice might not answer every question, but it sure does give us peace in the storm.

See also  Unlocking Knowledge: How Long Does It Take To Read The Bible

God’s got you, fam!

Why God’s Ways, Though Mysterious, Are Rooted in His Heart’s Cry for Change

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Life throws us curveballs, doesn’t it?

Questions that can make your head spin and your heart ache.

One of those head-scratchers is why God sometimes takes the innocent.

Let’s dive into this together, understanding that God’s heart beats for something beyond our immediate understanding.

God’s Cry for a U-Turn: Unveiling 2 Peter 3:9

Ever felt like asking God, “Hey, what’s the deal?”

I get it.

We all do.

And that’s where 2 Peter 3:9 steps in and sheds light.

It’s like a peek into God’s playbook.

Peter lays it out: > “The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men count slackness; but is longsuffering to us-ward, not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance.”

  • 2 Peter 3:9 (KJV).

God’s big desire?

Repentance.

A 180-degree turn in our hearts.

Even when things seem tangled and confusing, God’s ultimate game plan is to transform hearts.

Picture this: You’re a parent.

Your kid is wandering into a danger zone, and your heart is screaming for them to turn around, find safety, and embrace a better path.

That’s God with us.

He’s our Father, longing for us to veer away from harmful choices and walk toward Him, where true safety and peace reside.

Embracing a Relationship with God Through Jesus Christ

In our quest to understand, we can’t ignore the vital importance of a personal bond with God through Jesus Christ.

Amidst the questions and heartaches, the words of Jesus in John 10:10 offer a soothing balm: > “The thief cometh not, but for to steal, and to kill, and to destroy: I am come that they might have life, and that they might have it more abundantly.”

  • John 10:10 (KJV).

Through Christ, we find life in fullness, an invitation to a deep, life-changing relationship with God.

See, God’s actions, even when they seem tough to swallow, are infused with a hope for redemption.

Through Jesus, we’re given the chance to pivot away from our old ways and embrace a journey of righteousness and eternal life.

Every event, every action, is an invite to a turnaround and a deeper connection with our Creator.

Why Does God Take the Innocent? Jesus Christ: The Only Innocent

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Hey there, family!

We’re diving deep into one of those big questions today: “Why does God take the innocent?”

It’s a heavy one, no doubt, but we’re gonna break it down in a way that makes sense for everyone, young and old.

The Sinless Savior

First things first, let’s talk about Jesus.

Now, He’s the real deal, y’all.

Jesus walked this earth without a single speck of sin on Him.

I mean, we’re talking about the only truly innocent person to ever live.

The Bible puts it like this:

For we have not a high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin.”Hebrews 4:15 (KJV)

So, there’s your answer to why God takes the innocent.

Jesus, the epitome of innocence, was right there on that cross.

But why?

That’s the million-dollar question.

The Atoning Sacrifice

See, God’s plan is way bigger than we can fathom.

He’s not some mean, old guy up in the sky.

He’s all about justice and being in charge, and yeah, there are moments in the Old Testament where He brought judgment, like in Sodom and Gomorrah.

But here’s the beautiful twist: God’s justice always comes with a side of mercy.

That’s where Jesus comes in, my friends.

For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.”John 3:16 (KJV)

Jesus didn’t just die for the innocent; He died for everyone.

He took one for the team, and that team is all of humanity.

It’s like a get-out-of-jail-free card, but even better.

The Bigger Picture

Now, when we think about why God allows the innocent to suffer or even be sacrificed, we’ve gotta remember the cross.

That’s where the real action happened.

It’s like God’s masterpiece, where justice and grace collided.

So, even though we might not understand all of God’s ways, we can trust that He’s not a trickster.

He’s a God of high-level thinking, and His justice is coated in love and kindness.

When you see the innocent suffering, remember that Jesus took it all so we could have an abundant life.

As we tackle the tough questions, let’s keep our faith strong and remember that God’s got a master plan.

And in that plan, Jesus is the answer for the guilty, the innocent, and everyone in between.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Why Does God Kill The Innocent

Why did God destroy Sodom & Gomorrah?

God destroyed these cities due to their extreme wickedness and sinfulness, including rampant immorality and lack of hospitality.

It serves as a warning about the consequences of rejecting God’s standards.

Addressing the lack of righteousness and the plea of Abraham.

Abraham pleaded for the righteous in Sodom, highlighting God’s justice and mercy.

His plea shows God’s willingness to spare a place for the sake of the righteous few, emphasizing the importance of righteousness in God’s eyes.

(Genesis 18:23-33)

Why did God command the killing of certain tribes in the Old Testament?

Scientific theories and religious beliefs can complement each other.

Science explains the physical world, while faith addresses spiritual and moral aspects.

Understanding scientific theories broadens appreciation for God’s creation, encouraging exploration and deepening awe for His intricate design.

Discussing their detestable cultures and practices.

The Bible addresses detestable cultures and practices to guide believers toward righteous living.

Scriptures condemn behaviors inconsistent with God’s principles, emphasizing the importance of discernment and adherence to moral values.

Engaging in open discussions, guided by biblical wisdom, promotes understanding and aligns individuals with God’s moral standards.

Is anyone truly innocent in the eyes of God?

The concept of innocence in the eyes of God is a complex theological matter.

According to Christian beliefs, all have sinned (Romans 3:23).

Salvation is through faith in Jesus.

The idea of innocence is tied to redemption and forgiveness rather than inherent moral purity.

Reiterating the concept of universal sin and the biblical perspective.

The Bible teaches that universal sin is a result of the fall of humanity through Adam and Eve’s disobedience.

All humans inherit a sinful nature, but through Jesus Christ, we can find redemption and salvation.

Acknowledging our sinful nature and accepting Jesus as our Savior is fundamental in the biblical perspective on universal sin.

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